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RAP Program Listing

Select Program Description Residential Area Enrollment Limit Seat Remaining
Select Program Bio-Pioneers RAP; James Hall in Southwest Area Bio-Pioneers RAP in James Hall is by invitation only. Students will enroll together in "Introductory Biology I" (Biology 151) and a RAP seminar. The Bio-Pioneers RAP is designed to foster a passion for scientific research, celebrate the first-generation identity, build community, and provide academic and social support as students transition to college. In addition to providing a strong foundation in science the Bio-Pioneers RAP will ensure participants are well-prepared for careers in science and science-related fields through an emphasis on connecting students with undergraduate research experiences. Southwest 18 14
Select Program CNS CONNECT RAP; Cance in Southwest Area CNS Connect RAP is for students who are entering declared in a CNS (College of Natural Sciences) major or as undeclared in the Natural Sciences Exploratory Track. The students in this RAP will have a 1-credit first-year seminar together, taught in the Southwest residential area: This seminar focuses on how we use images to convey information and scientific ideas in a visually attractive and informative way, and includes practice creating memes and infographics that tell a story. Bad Luck Brian, Dat Boi, and Philosoraptor are all popular and fun social media memes. When we are mindlessly scrolling on social media, information is being transferred from the page to our brains. This passive form of communication can be helpful or harmful, so how do we determine fact from fake? We will explore how we, as scientists can use memes to talk about plant biology, physical chemistry, or astronomy. Southwest 38 33
Select Program CNS CONNECT RAP; Crabtree Hall in Northeast Area CNS Connect RAP is for students who are entering declared in a CNS (College of Natural Sciences) major or as undeclared in the Natural Sciences Exploratory Track. The students in this RAP will have a 1-credit first-year seminar together, taught in the Northeast residential area: This seminar will objectively look at principles of food science and culinary arts to slice against the grain in life's barriers. Students will be taught an array of unique skills from these disciplines to improve quality of palate and life. Prepare your ears, eyes, tongue, and mind: we'll challenge your sensory perception! Northeast 19 4
Select Program CNS CONNECT RAP; Kennedy Hall in Southwest Area CNS Connect RAP is for students who are entering declared in a CNS (College of Natural Sciences) major or as undeclared in the Natural Sciences Exploratory Track. The students in this RAP will have a 1-credit first-year seminar taught in the Southwest residential area: How does drinking your morning coffee or pulling an all-nighter affect your health? One way scientists look for answers to these questions about health and disease is to examine our cells- the body's building blocks. In this seminar, we will examine:the way cells work how external factors (e.g. caffeine) change their behavior, and how cellular changes can cause disease. Southwest 38 5
Select Program CNS Connect RAP; Knowlton Hall in Northeast Residential Area CNS Connect RAP is for students who are entering declared in a CNS (College of Natural Sciences) major or as undeclared in the Natural Sciences Exploratory Track. The students in this RAP will have a 1-credit first-year seminar together, taught in the Northeast residential area: This seminar will objectively look at principles of food science and culinary arts to slice against the grain in life's barriers. Students will be taught an array of unique skills from these disciplines to improve quality of palate and life. Prepare your ears, eyes, tongue, and mind: we'll challenge your sensory perception! Northeast 19 16
Select Program Communication MAJORS RAP; Pierpont Hall in Southwest Area The Communication Majors RAP is a program for students who are motivated to connect with other Communication majors, meet faculty from the department and learn about the goals and opportunities within the Department of Communication. Students will enroll together in "Intro to Media & Culture" (COMM 121), a 3-credit course that meets a department requirement, taught in the Southwest residential area. This course explores and speculates on how media has historically changed the way we see the world while also investigating how "new media" shapes our lives today. At the heart of this course is a critical approach to ideology. We will: examine representations of various groups in media, question how these ideological constructs are implicated and perpetuated by a capitalist economic system and, address topical issues such as social media privacy and fake news. Students in this course will collaborate in small discussion groups and produce original media (video, social media). While this course does introduce students to the methods for writing academic essays about media, students will be encouraged to supplement their writing with media production. Southwest 30 26
Select Program Computer Science Majors RAP; Dickinson Hall in Orchard Hill Area Computer Science Majors RAP is a great way to make a successful transition to the academic and social life at UMass Amherst. Students who apply (deadline May 11) and are accepted (notification of acceptance will be May 18) to this program will have the opportunity to connect with other motivated Computer Science majors, meet faculty, and learn about opportunities within the College of Information and Computer Sciences at UMass. Orchard Hill 38 11
Select Program Computing & Informatics EXPLORATORY RAP; Dickinson Hall in Orchard Hill Area Computing & Informatics Exploratory RAP is designed for undeclared students entering UMass in the Computing & Informatics Exploratory Track. Students who apply (deadline May 11) and are accepted (notification of acceptance will be May 18) into this RAP will enroll together in a first-year seminar designed and taught by the College of Information and Computer Science. Students will live together in Dickinson Hall and enroll in courses on the main campus. Orchard Hill 19 5
Select Program Connecting with Social Justice RAP; Moore Hall in Southwest Area Students in Connecting with Social Justice RAP in Moore Hall will enroll together in "Social Change in the 1960s" (History 154). This course examines the major historical events and social justice movements that took place from the mid-1950s into the 1970s through the lens of pop culture, including rock 'n' roll. Considering race, class, gender, sexuality, and nation, students will be encouraged to think critically about music's impact then, as well as its connections to the world today. Southwest 30 0
Select Program Cultural Explorations RAP; Mary Lyon Hall in Northeast Area Students in Cultural Explorations RAP in Mary Lyon Hall will enroll together in "Ancient Civilizations" (Anthropology 150). In this course, we will use archaeological data to explore a range of civilizations in the Near East and the Americas. We will study small-scale foraging societies, the emergence of the very first cities and states, and even a few civilizations that seem to fit somewhere "in between." While we will be focusing on the past through the physical records people left behind, we will always attempt to take the practices we see and relate them to our own human experience. We will do this through interactive, engaged discussions. Northeast 30 24
Select Program Cultural Explorations RAP; Thoreau Hall in Southwest Area Students in Cultural Explorations RAP in Thoreau Hall will enroll together in "Literature and Culture" (Afro Am 151). 'Everyone's a critic' especially when it comes to music. But how does one critically engage music? More specifically, where does one even begin to build an analytical understanding of a genre of music? In this course, we will approach Black genres of music from historical, cultural and literary perspectives. Further, we will discuss the ways in which Black music permeates other forms of culture such as literature and media (film, fashion, dancing, etc.). Topics will include the simultaneous evolution of the blues and jazz, the radicalization of jazz after WWII, the sexual politics of soul and funk music and the creation of hip-hop culture from the remnants of disco. By the end of this course you will be able to identify and define characteristics that exemplify a basic knowledge of the Black music genres explored during the course. This knowledge can serve as a foundation for further study in music, history and/or Afro Am studies. Southwest 30 21
Select Program Cultural Explorations RAP; Van Meter Hall in Central Area Students in Cultural Explorations RAP in Van Meter Hall will enroll together in "Problems in Social Thought" (Philosophy 170). This course will explore key issues that both American and global society are facing in the 21st century, including the oppression of women and people of color, and, in recent years, the growth of authoritarian, nationalist, and populist movements. Students will examine recent philosophical work on these topics in an attempt to understand the nature of women's oppression, racism, and fascism. After becoming familiar with both the philosophical and empirical nature of these issues, students will be equipped to engage in productive conversations about race, gender, and authority in society, as well as our moral obligations to oppression and fascism. This course will provide the intellectual resources required to be effective agents of social change. Central 30 0
Select Program Cultural Explorations RAP; Wheeler Hall in Central Area Students in Cultural Explorations RAP in Wheeler Hall will enroll together in "Hunger in the Global Economy" (Resource Economics 121). We will explore hunger across the globe as one of the most important questions that we face today. We will examine the problem through the methods of analysis in social sciences, with a particular focus on techniques developed in economics. The goal would be to use these methods to engage with fundamental questions: Where and why does hunger exist? And why does it persist? What policy responses have been formulated? What are the limitations of these responses? Central 30 26
Select Program Emerging Scholars RAP; Melville Hall in Southwest Area This RAP is by invitation and application only; accepted students must confirm their space in this RAP. Students will enroll together in a small section of an honors level of the Gen Ed course Introduction to Sociology (Sociology 110H). RAP students will also enroll together in a seminar offered through the Commonwealth Honors College. Southwest 18 10
Select Program Engineering EXPLORATORY RAP; Dwight Hall in Northeast Area Engineering EXPLORATORY RAP is designed specifically for undeclared students who have been admitted into the Engineering Exploratory Track. Students will live together in Dwight Hall in the Northeast residential area. Students will have an option to join one of three history course options that full fill the new Diversity Gen Ed requirement. See program page on RAP website for course descriptions. Northeast 38 20
Select Program Engineering MAJORS RAP; Dickinson Hall in Orchard Hill Area The Engineering Majors RAP is open to any student who has been admitted to UMass Amherst as an Engineering Major. Students will live together in Dickinson Hall in the Orchard Hill residential area. This RAP is intended for non-honors students. It is also offered in the Northeast residential area. Students will have an option to join one of three history course options that full fill the new Diversity Gen Ed requirement. See program page on RAP website for course descriptions. Orchard Hill 38 19
Select Program Engineering MAJORS RAP; Leach Hall in Northeast Area The Engineering Majors RAP is open to any student who has been admitted to UMass Amherst as an Engineering Major. Students who join this RAP will live in Leach Hall in the Northeast residential area. This RAP is designed for non-Honors students. This RAP is also offered in the Orchard Hill residential area. Students will have an option to join one of three history course options that full fill the new Diversity Gen Ed requirement. See program page on RAP website for course descriptions. Northeast 72 38
Select Program Equine Science RAP; Dwight Hall in Northeast Area Students in Equine Science RAP will live together in Dwight Hall in the northeast residential area and enroll together in a 1-credit college seminar. In the seminar, through an interdisciplinary and historical lens, students will delve into the domestication and interdependence of horses and people, the changes and patterns over time, and the resulting implications for the equine industry and the quality of life for horses, people, and the planet. This RAP is restricted to students admitted as Animal Science majors. Northeast 19 19
Select Program Exploring Society RAP; Moore Hall in Southwest Area Students in Exploring Society RAP in Moore Hall will enroll together in "Race, Gender, Class and Ethnicity" (Sociology 106). This course will cultivate students' understanding of racial, ethnic, class, national, gender, and sexual identities. Using foundational and cutting-edge sociological research and theory, students will engage in a critical examination of social inequalities related to these identities. Through interactive lectures, class discussions, and group work, students will develop an understanding of: how social and historical processes shape our understanding of these identities, and how social inequalities have been maintained within dominant institutions, including families, schools, workplaces, and the media. Students will develop critical thinking, writing, researching, and speaking skills, in addition to cultivating their sociological imagination with creative solutions that work to end inequalities through resistance and social change. Southwest 30 11
Select Program Exploring Society RAP; Thoreau Hall in Southwest Area Students in Exploring Society RAP in Thoreau Hall will enroll together in "Education and Film" (Education 167). What do movies like Mean Girls, Ferris Bueller's Day Off, The Breakfast Club, and Freedom Writers teach us about education? Do the way films represent school, students, and teaching reflect or reproduce our views about particular students and schools? What and how do movies teach us and why does it matter? In this course we will: examine Hollywood representations of teaching and schooling; analyze film as both a product and producer of American society and culture; learn to identify and understand dominant educational ideologies and the real world impact these ideologies have; conduct media analysis based on race, class, gender, and sexuality; and reflect on our own identities and educational experiences. Southwest 30 0
Select Program Exploring Society RAP; Webster Hall in Orchard Hill Residential Area Students in Exploring Society RAP in Webster Hall will enroll together in "Social Problems" (Sociology 103). In this course, students will consider the United States' major social problems, how they come to be defined as such, and how sociologists think about and study them. We will examine different sociological theories and perspectives to explore topics such as crime, drug use, mental illness, sexuality, and families. We will also discuss persistent inequalities based in race, social class, gender, etc., paying attention to power, and how those with more or less societal power define and dispute what constitutes a social problem. Students will strengthen their critical thinking skills while learning to think like a sociologist, making connections between "private troubles" and "public issues", and learning a whole new set of questions about the world around us. Orchard Hill 30 21
Select Program Global Opportunities RAP; Mary Lyon Hall in Northeast Area Students in Global Opportunities RAP in Mary Lyon Hall will enroll together in "Brave New World" (Comparative Literature 131). This course is inspired by Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. In this RAP course, We will explore contemporary examples of futuristic dystopian societies from around the world, including Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale, George Miller's Mad Max: Fury Road, Octavia Butler's Parable of the Sower, Alex Rivera's film Sleepdealer, Shirley Jackon's "The Lottery," and selected Black Mirror episodes, among others. We will discuss and analyze questions these futuristic societies present for us today such as: where are the limits of data surveillance? Should we revisit certain traditions? How do we build a more just society for everyone? What makes us human? How do we create positive change in the face of grim ecological prospects? Northeast 30 21
Select Program Global Opportunities RAP; Moore Hall in Southwest Area Students in Global Opportunities RAP in Moore Hall will enroll together in "Culture, Society & People" (Anthropology 104). This course introduces key concepts, topics, and methods in cultural anthropology, one of the four subfields of anthropology. The goal of cultural anthropology is to make the strange familiar and the familiar strange. Students will begin to see the world like a cultural anthropologist-- interested in how people live, what they believe in, how they talk, what they eat and why, and more. Students will critically engage with questions that have been foundational in anthropology, such as: Does race exist?; Are men and women driven by biology?; Do all human societies have similar patterns of inequality? We will also look at newer questions such as: Has the internet changed our social relations? Students will read articles and ethnographies, watch films and conduct research of their own on campus. Southwest 30 0
Select Program Global Viewpoints; Gorman Hall in Central Residential Area Students in Global Viewpoints RAP in Gorman Hall will enroll together in "Human Nature" (Anthropology 100) and explore how cultural practices and beliefs shape the world we live in. Topics are drawn from life, and include everything from the importance of cell phones, to coffee production across the globe. Students will explore various anthropological themes and issues that directly relate to their everyday lives as global citizens. Central 30 0
Select Program Health Sciences RAP; Emerson Hall in Southwest Area Students in Health Sciences RAP in Emerson Hall will enroll together in "Introduction to Kinesiology" (Kinesiology 100). This course is an interdisciplinary approach to Kinesiology, the science of human movement. It will include a rounded overview of the subfields of Kinesiology including motor control, exercise physiology, biomechanics, sports medicine, exercise neuroscience, and exercise psychology. Students will be introduced to scientific research articles and evidence-based theories and practices. This course will encourage critical thinking about how science is portrayed to the public and will help students develop skills to maintain health and wellness over their lifetime. Southwest 30 0
Select Program Health Sciences RAP; James Hall in Southwest Area Students in Health Sciences RAP in James Hall will enroll together in "My Body, My Health" (Public Health 160). In this course, students will focus on health topics that promote individual and community wellness, including those that are relevant to college students. For example, we will discuss how to maintain healthy eating habits when faced with multiple choices and options; how to navigate stress in a healthy way; and how to find time to excel in academics while still having a healthy social life. This course uses collaborative, socially engaged approaches to examine topics such as resilience and stress, healthy eating, social image, social activism, environmental health, substance use, healthy relationships, and human sexuality with an emphasis on helping you get the most out of your college experience. Southwest 30 0
Select Program HFA CONNECT RAP; Van Meter Hall in Central Area HFA Connect RAP is an opportunity for students who are entering declared in any HFA (College of Humanities & Fine Arts) major or undeclared in the Humanities & Fine Arts Exploratory Track to live together and have their college seminar taught in the Central residential area. In this 1-credit seminar students will explore the origins of race as a concept and its pervasive influence on American life. Through four units that scaffold upon each other, students will expand their understanding of this social, cultural, political, and economic process. Central 19 17
Select Program Impact!: Self Awareness, Social Justice & Service RAP; Melville Hall in Southwest Area Students in Impact!: Self Awareness, Social Justice and Service RAP in Melville Hall will enroll together in "Self-Awareness, Social Justice & Service" (Service Learning 192).This is a year-long RAP, developed and coordinated through the Office of Civic Engagement & Service Learning (CESL) which deeply integrates social justice theory and awareness building through readings, activities, written reflections, mindfulness practice and dialogues. By the end of the semester students will have a greater self awareness of how they fit into the diverse world community. Students explore the many ways that their service experience connects with their personal and academic lives. The spring semester required course continues exploring themes of social justice but with a focus on elements of leadership in these issues. What is leadership? How do we lead? Students take action with their own organizing project this semester. Southwest 26 0
Select Program Investigating Consumerism RAP; Gorman Hall in Central Area Students in Investigating Consumerism RAP in Gorman Hall will enroll together in "Introduction to Resource Economics" (Resource Economics 102). In this course we will: build the fundamentals of microeconomics, which will help you understand how consumers and firms make decisions; learn about how these decisions are made within a market framework; and explore what happens when economic markets fail. You will be able to apply this knowledge to your interests and gain the necessary skills to have a deeper understanding of how, as consumers and maybe future producers, economics impacts and plays a role in your everyday life. NOTE: Although there is no restriction on this course, it is recommended that students score at least a 16 on Part A of the Math Placement Test. Central 30 6
Select Program Investigating Consumerism RAP; Thoreau Hall in Southwest Residential Area Students in Investigating Consumerism RAP in Thoreau Hall will enroll together in "Consumer in Society" (Resource Economics 162). This course provides an analysis of the crucial role that consumers play in society including their consumption activities as well as their decision-making. An interdisciplinary perspective will be used - research findings from a variety of disciplines will be applied to better understand consumers' economic decisions. Critical thinking skills will be used to examine a variety of contemporary consumer economic issues in addition to topics such as consumer rights and responsibilities, the impact of advertising, use of consumer credit, product safety, consumer fraud, and legal protections available to consumers. Southwest 30 0
Select Program Investigating Politics RAP; Pierpont Hall in Southwest Area Students in Investigating Politics RAP in Pierpont Hall will enroll together in "Controversies in Public Policy" (Political Science 181). This course will explore the nature and origins of important, hot-button issues, providing students the opportunity to analyze, critique, and review policy positions and debates, including: gun control, immigration, government regulation of access to birth control, and healthcare. Students will engage in lively discussions and advocate for their own opinions in written work. By the end of this course students will have gained and understanding of both the history and modern implications of these policies, and will be prepared to debate these topics with anyone. Southwest 30 0
Select Program Investigating Politics RAP; Webster Hall in Orchard Hill Residential Area Students in Investigating Politics RAP in Webster Hall will enroll together in "American Politics" (Political Science 101). This course explores contemporary problems in American politics: its contradictions, trade-offs, and popular misunderstandings. Students will apply political science research and theories in exploring: how choices about political rules impact the everyday practice of politics; who participates in politics and the effect these citizens have on society; which potential reforms address political deficiencies and what repercussions are associated with political decisions. By the end of the semester, students will be able to critically engage with questions such as: Why do voters who are disgusted with Congress continually reelect the same politicians? What are the unintended consequences of campaign finance reform? Does the average voter have enough political knowledge to make democracy work? Orchard Hill 30 28
Select Program Investigating Politics RAP; Wheeler Hall in Central Area Students in Investigating Politics RAP in Wheeler Hall will enroll together in "Intro to Comparative Politics" (Political Science 111). This course will introduce the core areas of Comparative Politics, a subfield of Political Science. Students will analyze historically grounded cases, to examine how the world came to be carved up and dominated by states, nations, and markets. This course will cultivate students' understanding of present-day conflicts: colonialism, economic development, inequality, social movements, and the environmental crisis. Students will explore questions such as: Why do people sometimes resist political domination, and sometimes enthusiastically accept it? Why do some regions have obscene levels of wealth, while others suffer from devastating poverty? How have these institutions evolved, and how much will they continue to matter in an increasingly interconnected world? How can we uncover the power that hides within defining these concepts, and the stories we tell about them? Students will develop the tools needed to critically analyze political processes, and begin to think about their place in the contemporary political world. Central 30 20
Select Program ISENBERG SOM Business in a Global Society Fellows RAP; Pierpont Hall in Southwest Area This RAP is restricted to students admitted into the Isenberg School of Management who applied and were accepted as Isenberg Fellows. Students enroll in a main campus lecture "Intro to Microeconomics" (ECON 103), and a corresponding small discussion section in the residential area. Students will enroll in an Isenberg School of Management seminar. Southwest 54 14
Select Program ISENBERG SOM Business Leadership Fellows RAP; Cance Hall in Southwest Area This RAP is restricted to students admitted into the Isenberg School of Management who applied and were accepted as Isenberg Fellows. Students enroll in a main campus lecture "Intro to Microeconomics" (ECON 103), and a corresponding small discussion section in the residential area. Students will enroll in an Isenberg School of Management seminar. Southwest 54 21
Select Program Literary Perspectives RAP; Van Meter Hall in Central Area Students in Literary Perspectives RAP in Van Meter Hall will enroll together in "World Literature in English" (English 144). In this course, we will explore these questions through "postcolonial literatures" (literatures produced in the wake of colonization) written in English. Focusing mainly on the aftermath of the British Empire, we will read various kinds of literary texts, short stories, poems, essays, and novels by writers from South Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean. We will think about how postcolonial literary texts complicate our understanding of key concepts such as identity, nation, resistance, freedom, progress, language, race, and gender. Some of the questions that we will consider include: How do legacies of colonization influence national, cultural, and linguistic identity? How do the internal hierarchies (of gender, class, religion, ethnicity, etc.) of postcolonial societies intersect with the residues of colonization? How do postcolonial writers represent and critique the problems of their societies without being co-opted into colonial stereotypes? What are the new forms of colonialism that structure world politics and culture today? Writers we may read include Chinua Achebe, Jean Rhys, Salman Rushdie, Arundhati Roy, Derek Walcott, JM Coetzee, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Central 30 24
Select Program Nursing MAJORS RAP; Kennedy Hall in Southwest Area This RAP is an option for any student who has been admitted to UMass Amherst as a first-year Nursing Major. Students will enroll together in a seminar offered by the College of Nursing. Southwest 38 15
Select Program Partners In Education (PiE) RAP; Melville Hall in Southwest Area This RAP is by invitation; eligible students will receive an invitation in the spring. Accepted students must confirm their space, and will enroll together in a Gen Ed course "Intro to Macroeconomics" (ECON 104) related to business (main campus lecture and small residential discussion section). Students will enroll in an Isenberg School of Management seminar. Southwest 40 25
Select Program Performing & Visual Arts MAJORS RAP; Van Meter Hall in Central Area This RAP is designed for 38 first-year students who have been admitted as Art, Art History, Architecture & Design, Dance, Music, and Theater majors. Students will enroll in a special first-year seminar designed through the college of Humanities & Fine Arts, specifically for the PVA Majors RAP. (There will be two sections of 19 students each.) In this seminar, students will discuss the many issues that face the quickly changing environment of the visual and performing arts. Students will explore how as artists, you must collaborate and find creative solutions to the unique challenges that may cross your paths in life. Central 38 24
Select Program Perspectives in Health Topics RAP; Emerson Hall in Southwest Area Students in Perspectives in Health Topics RAP in Emerson Hall will enroll together in "Medical Ethics" (Philosophy 164).This course focuses on moral issues arising from medical practice and biomedical technology. Medical decisions are often morally complex, making it difficult to decide what is right (and what is wrong) to do. It is imperative, then, to think as clearly as we can through different ethical issues that medical decisions present, so that we might make defensible choices. Students will explore a variety of questions around these issues. After considering some proposed answers and arguments for and against them, students will work together to evaluate and articulate which answers they think are best and why. Southwest 30 0
Select Program Perspectives in Health Topics RAP; Kennedy Hall in Southwest Area Students in Perspectives in Health Topics RAP in Kennedy Tower will enroll together in "Medical Ethics" (Philosophy 164). In this course, students will cultivate skills that are crucial for discussing difficult ethical issues in medical practice. Students will work collectively to articulate the possible answers while exploring various questions related to these issues. Students will practice giving and receiving feedback in a respectful, constructive way. By the end of the semester, students will have developed skills for articulating various ethical positions and for assessing arguments for and against such positions. Southwest 30 0
Select Program PHHS CONNECT RAP; Emerson Hall in Southwest Area PHHS Connect RAP is an opportunity for students who are entering declared in a PHHS (School of Public Health & Health Sciences) major or undeclared in the Public Health & Health Sciences Exploratory Track to live together and have their collegiate first-year seminar taught in the residential area. Public health and the health sciences are incredibly broad and diverse fields, especially as the fields constantly evolve to address the health issues that face people across the globe. Throughout the semester, we will explore different areas of public health such as nutrition, communication disorders, physical activity, community health, and health policy. This seminar will connect these different disciplines of public health to current events facing the world today. We will explore numerous opportunities and resources available at UMass in order to maximize student success in the School of Public Health and Health Sciences and beyond. Southwest 19 7
Select Program SBS CONNECT RAP; Moore Hall in Southwest Area Students in the SBS Connect RAP in Moore Hall will enroll together in a one-credit seminar (SocBehav 191) taught in their residential area. This seminar is designed for incoming students who have declared a major or are on the Exploratory Track (undeclared) in the College of Social & Behavioral Sciences. This seminar will help students to begin planning their individual academic goals and pathways toward achieving them. Students will explore the different fields and majors in SBS (as well as a range of other options at UMass) and learn the importance of thinking like a social scientist. Students will connect with classmates and the instructor while participate in stimulating discussions and collaborative learning projects, while developing the academic and self-care skills needed to be successful in college. Students will take part in activities and exercises to explore UMass resources and opportunities needed to become a contributing member of the community, both at UMass and beyond. Southwest 19 14
Select Program SBS CONNECT RAP; Pierpont Hall in Southwest Area Students in the SBS Connect RAP in Pierpont Hall will enroll together in a one-credit seminar (SocBehav 191) taught in their residential area. This seminar is designed for incoming students who have declared a major or are on the Exploratory Track (undeclared) in the College of Social & Behavioral Sciences. This seminar will help students to begin planning their individual academic goals and pathways toward achieving them. Students will explore the different fields and majors in SBS (as well as a range of other options at UMass) and learn the importance of thinking like a social scientist. Students will connect with classmates and the instructor while participate in stimulating discussions and collaborative learning projects, while developing the academic and self-care skills needed to be successful in college. Students will take part in activities and exercises to explore UMass resources and opportunities needed to become a contributing member of the community, both at UMass and beyond. Southwest 19 8
Select Program Science & Culture RAP; Kennedy Hall in Southwest Area Students in Science & Culture RAP in Kennedy Hall will enroll together in "The Science of Food" (Food-Sci 150). In this course, students will explore the prominent role that food plays in each of our daily lives and how at the same time, most of us have little if any understanding of the "science" behind our food. We will discuss specific issues such as the challenges we face in our "throw away culture" where Americans waste 40% of all food produced in the United States, food safety and dietary concerns, labeling and regulatory guidelines, how our society addresses these issues from a chemical, biochemical, microbial and regulatory point of view to ensure an adequate and wholesome food supply is maintained for all. Through critical thinking and engaging class discussions a range of topics will be explored and critiqued. Southwest 30 0
Select Program Science & Culture RAP; Dickinson Hall in Orchard Hill Area Students in Science & Culture RAP in Dickinson Hall will enroll together in "Intro to Science Fiction" (Comparative Literature 133). Science fiction is now one of the most popular genres in contemporary culture in the United States and around the world, yet the phrase became popular when introduced in pulp magazines in the 1920s. In order to understand the scope of this genre, students will read a series of short stories, plays, comic books, and novels, as well as watch films and television shows. The stories of the science fiction genre often respond to the issues and problems of their historical moment. In this discussion-based course, we will work to understand these works in their historical contexts, while also attempting to understand their relevance to our present day. Orchard Hill 30 14
Select Program Scientific Thinking RAP; James Hall in Southwest Residential Area Students in Scientific Thinking RAP in James Hall will enroll together in "The History of Science and Technology in the Western World" (History 181). This course examines the development of science and technology in the West, focusing on key scientific ideas, discoveries, and players during the modern period spanning from the Scientific Revolution to the Cold War. Students will critically examine science's historical interaction with culture, politics, and religion. By the end of the semester, students will be able to evaluate and analyze both primary and secondary sources and engage with fundamental questions: What is "science", who are "scientists" and how does science happen? How has science changed the way we see, interpret, and understand the world around us? How do power and money benefit and/or constrain science? And, ultimately, is science a force for good or ill? Southwest 30 0
Select Program Scientific Thinking RAP; Knowlton Hall in Northeast Area Students in Scientific Thinking RAP in Knowlton Hall will enroll together in "Introduction to Philosophy" (Philosophy 100). "Scientific practice is aimed at expanding our understanding of the actual and the possible, of what is the case and what could be the case. In this course, students will examine the role of philosophy in thinking about how to best approach scientific practice: What is knowledge? What does it take to get it? Why is it valuable? What separates scientific knowledge from other kinds of knowledge? What role does thinking about possibility play in motivating creativity and discovery in scientific inquiry? How do we fit into the natural world that we study? Are we part of it? Does that threaten objectivity? We'll discuss these and other questions by means of philosophical writings, science fiction, film, and television. Students will engage in rigorous argumentation and written and visual storytelling in this discussion-based course. Together we will discover the philosophical foundations for scientific knowledge. Northeast 30 17
Select Program Sustainability & Society RAP; Cance Hall in Southwest Area Students in Sustainability & Society RAP in Cance Hall will enroll together in "Sustainable Living: Solutions for the 21st Century" (Natural Resources Conservation 185), which examines the intersections between society, economics, and the environment. Sustainable Living is an interdisciplinary course that examines the impact (both positive and negative) of individual actions on our society, environment and economy. Students will be challenged to consider their role in defining tomorrow's global society, and will have opportunities to create meaningful change in their local community. Sustainable Living considers the science behind consumption, and channels student energy and creativity into real-world solutions. Southwest 30 0
Select Program Sustainability & Society RAP; Mary Lyon Hall in Northeast Area Students in Sustainability & Society RAP in Mary Lyon Hall will enroll together in "Sustainable Living: Solutions for the 21st Century" (Natural Resources Conservation 185), which examines the intersections between society, economics, and the environment. Sustainable Living is an interdisciplinary course that examines the impact (both positive and negative) of individual actions on our society, environment and economy. Students will be challenged to consider their role in defining tomorrow's global society, and will have opportunities to create meaningful change in their local community. Sustainable Living considers the science behind consumption, and channels student energy and creativity into real-world solutions. Northeast 30 21
Select Program Veterinary & Animal Sciences MAJORS RAP; Crabtree Hall in Northeast Area Vet & Animal Sci Majors RAP students live together in Crabtree Hall in the Northeast area of campus. This RAP is a wonderful opportunity for you to connect with other motivated Veterinary & Animal Sciences majors, meet faculty, and learn about opportunities within the department. Students will enroll in a seminar offered by the Veterinary & Animal Sciences Department. Northeast 38 9

Commonwealth/Honors College Program Listing

Select Program Description Residential Area Enrollment Limit Seat Remaining
Select Program Contemplations in Literature Honors RAP: Sycamore Hall, CHC Residential Area Students in this program will enjoy exploring creative poetry and fiction in this Honors RAP. Students are required to be roommates with others in this program. Commonwealth Honors College Residential Community 24 0
Select Program Contemporary Topics in Politics Honors RAP: Oak Hall; CHC Residential Community Contemporary Topics in Politics is ideal for students interested in expanding their understanding of politics and government. Students will study Political Theory and will explore current events, with a focus on the 2018 elections. Students will have a roommate who is also in this program. Commonwealth Honors College Residential Community 24 0
Select Program Culture in a Changing Society Honors RAP: Oak Hall; CHC Residential Community For students interested in understanding the nature of culture and its role in creating forms of social, economic, and political life. Students must be roommates with another student in this program.  Commonwealth Honors College Residential Community 24 0
Select Program Engineering Honors RAP; Sycamore Hall - CHC Residential Community For Honors Engineering students who want to take engineering-related courses and live on an engineering floor. Students can easily work together on math problems and engineering projects. Commonwealth Honors College Residential Community 60 24
Select Program Explorations in Health Science; Sycamore Hall - CHC Residential Community Students in the Explorations in Health Science Honors RAP will explore and discuss the ethical topics related to medicine and health care in their Intro to Medical Ethics course. In addition, students will also enroll in Ideas that Change the World. These courses satisfy both Honors and General Education requirements. Students must be roommates with other students in this program.  Commonwealth Honors College Residential Community 24 0
Select Program Isenberg Honors Special Topics-Business; Oak Hall -CHC Residential Community For Isenberg students who want to understand how products and services will be produced and consumed in ensuing decades of the 21st Century. Students must be roommates with someone in this program. Commonwealth Honors College Residential Community 18 0
Select Program Isenberg Honors World of Possibilities & Business RAP; Oak - CHC Residential Community For Isenberg students interested in further exploring and realizing their passion, especially related to Business. Students must be roommates with someone in this program. Commonwealth Honors College Residential Community 18 0
Select Program Perspectives Honors RAP: Oak Hall, CHC Residential Community Perspectives Honors RAP is ideal for students who are interested in discussing and debating ethical issues. Students must be roommates with another person in the program. Commonwealth Honors College Residential Community 24 0
Select Program Philosophical Foundations Honors RAP; Sycamore Hall, CHC Residential Community This program is ideal for students interested in an introductory philosophy course. Explore the well-known philosophers in western history, and the topics they considered. Learn to examine and analyze philosophical arguments throughout the semester. Students must be roommates with another student in this program. Commonwealth Honors College Residential Community 24 0

TAP Program Listing

Select Program Description Residential Area Enrollment Limit Seat Remaining
Select Program BIOTAP; Sycamore Hall - CHC Residential Community This unique Talent Advancement Program (TAP) is designed for 48 first-year students who are admitted to UMass Amherst as Commonwealth Honors College students declared in a biological science major. Students who were invited, have applied and been accepted must confirm their space. Commonwealth Honors College Residential Community 48 5